Thursday, December 15, 2016

Cold Weather Problems - Precautions To Prevent Water Pipes From Freezing


With below-freezing temperatures in the forecast, a few simple steps can keep you and your family safe and your home's pipes from freezing. Please review the below tips to help minimize the possibility or damage.


  • Prepare your pipes in advance. Remove, drain and store garden hoses used outside. If practical, use an inside valve to shut off and drain water from pipes leading to outside faucets. This reduces the chance of freezing pipes just inside your house.
  • Properly winterize automatic landscaping sprinkler systems. 
  • Check and monitor any exposed pipes in unheated areas such as basements, garages, attics and crawlspaces.
  • Locate the main water shut off for your home so that if a pipe bursts, you can shut off the water and minimize damage.
  • Open cabinet doors in the kitchen and bathrooms to let heat in and around the plumbing.  Especially important if some of these pipes run up against outside walls.
  • Keep any garage doors closed if there are water pipes or supply lines in the garage.  If attached to home and safe, consider opening the door to the garage to allow some home heat to enter the garage. While your heating bill may take a hit, the cost will not compare to costly repairs from water damage.
  • DO NOT use kerosene or other fuel fed heating devices in the garage to heat it.
  • Let water drip from faucets served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe (even at a dribble) can help prevent pipes from freezing.
  • DO NOT use a blow torch, r or any other open flame to try and thaw out potentially frozen pipes!
  • Mobile homes are typically more vulnerable to frozen pipes so take proper precautions. 
  • Keep the thermostat set to no lower than 55° F during the evening hours or if you will be leaving the home for an extended period of time (day or night).
 
Please check on your elderly neighbors and friends who may need additional assistance to ensure their safety and always having working smoke alarms in your home. Visit us at www.mcfrs.org/mcsafe for more safety tips.

Stay informed. Sign up for Alert Montgomery. For information, visit https://alert.montgomerycountymd.gov/register.php

Wednesday, December 14, 2016

Why are space heaters dangerous? What you need to know!


December through March are peak months for home fire deaths. While space heaters can be a quick way to heat up a chilly room, that warmth comes with a BIG warning label: Each year, space heaters are involved in 79% of fatal home heating fires. As temperatures drop, here are 10 things you need to know:


  1. Give the heater some space. Keep your space heater at least THREE feet away from anything flammable. That means clothes and blankets, stacks of newspapers, furniture, rugs and even walls. Allow at least three feet of open space on each side of the unit.



  2. Never (ever) use an extension cord with a space heater. To prevent a fire, never plug a high-wattage space heater into an extension cord or multi-outlet strip.

  3. Opt for quality. When shopping for a space heater, select a unit that has all the latest safety features and the Underwriter’s Laboratory (UL) label of approval. Look for cool-to-the-touch housings and automatic shutoff features that turn the unit off if it’s tipped over or overheating. Some units will automatically shut off if their infrared sensors detect a person or object that is too close to the heater panel—making them desirable choices for households with kids or pets.


  4. Never leave a space heater “on” in an unoccupied room. Always turn off a space heater when you leave the room and before going to bed. Throw on some extra blankets and unplug the unit as an extra precaution.


  5. Size matters. Before purchasing a space heater, check the label to see if it is the appropriate size for the area you want to heat.

  6. Make sure your house can handle it. Space heaters use a lot of electricity --- as much as fifteen 100-watt light bulbs. This can be too much for older houses with old wires and electrical circuits. When wires get overheated, fires can also start inside the walls where they are hard to spot. If the circuit breaker trips, don’t plug it back in.

  7. Keep space heaters away from water. Like any electrical device, they pose a shock hazard. To help prevent shocks, avoid using space heaters in rooms where spills and moisture build-ups are likely such at bathrooms and kitchens.

  8. Safety first. Check your heaters regularly – look for frayed wires and remove dust accumulation on grates, grills, coils and other elements of the heater.



  9. Hot, hot, hot. Some parts of the heater can become really hot. Children, seniors and pets are especially vulnerable to getting burned.




  10. Finally, don’t rely totally on space heaters to heat your home. They’re designed to supplement a central heating strategy – not replace it. Make sure every room in which you plan to use a space heater has a working smoke alarm and that your house has a carbon monoxide alarm.





Thursday, December 8, 2016

Eight Things Never to Do With an Extension Cord

Extension cords are a convenient way to bring temporary power to electrical devices. Used without proper caution, they can become a fire hazard and pose a serious risk to your personal safety. Follow these tips to help keep your home safe:

Selecting extension cords

  • Purchase only cords that have been approved by an independent testing laboratory.
  • For outdoor projects, use only extension cords marked for outdoor use.
  • Read the instructions (if available) for information about the cord’s correct use and the amount of power it draws when running.
  • Select cords that are rated to handle the wattage of the devices with which they’ll be used. A cord’s gauge indicates its size: The smaller the number, the larger the wire and the more electrical current the cord can safely handle.
  • Also consider the length you’ll need. Longer cords can’t handle as much current as shorter cords of the same gauge.
  • Choose cords with polarized or three-prong plugs.
  • For use with larger appliances, thick, round, low-gauge extension cords are best. For smaller appliances and electronics, you can use thin or flat cords.

Using extension cords

  • Never remove an extension cord’s grounding pin in order to fit it into a two-prong outlet.
  • Never use extension cords to power appliances. Plug appliances directly into wall outlets. .
  • Never use indoor extension cords outdoors.
  • Don’t plug multiple cords together.
  • Don’t run extension cords under rugs or furniture.
  • Never tape extension cords to floors or attach them to surfaces with staples or nails.
  • Don’t bend or coil cords when they’re in use.
  • Immediately stop using extension cords that feel hot to the touch or show signs of deterioration.

Caring for extension cords

  • Always store cords indoors.
  • Unplug extension cords when they’re not in use.
  • Throw away damaged cords.
  • Pull the plug—not the cord—when disconnecting from the outlet.
  • Consider covering unused cord receptacles with childproof covers.
And remember that extension cords are intended as temporary wiring solutions. If you find you’re using them on a permanent basis, consider updating your home’s electrical system.

Note: the information in this article was obtained from various sources including State Farm Insurance. While it is believed to be reliable and accurate, we do not warrant the accuracy or reliability of the information. These suggestions are not a complete list of every loss control measure. The information is not intended to replace manuals or instructions provided by the manufacturer or the advice of a qualified professional. 

Monday, December 5, 2016

Tis the season to be … SAFE! Deck the halls with boughs of Safety

In the hustle and bustle of the holiday season, it may be tempting to take a few short cuts. Fire Chief Scott Goldstein asks that you make sure that safety isn’t one of them!   


Christmas trees require special attention. When selecting a tree, freshness is important. Check the needles to make sure they are green and difficult to pull back from the branches. If the tree has been freshly cut, the needles should not break. Tap the tree on the ground several times and notice if any needles fall off. If they do, the tree is probably dried out and could be a fire hazard.  Water your tree daily and do not place the tree close to a heat source, including a fireplace, radiator, space heater or heat vent. Make sure your tree is in a sturdy holder and can't be knocked over by pets or children.

Using extension cords? Overloaded extension cords and outlets can present a serious fire safety hazard. Make sure that the extension cord is suitable for the electrical “load” needed. Do not place cords under furniture or rugs and never plug two extension cords together to increase the total length. Demanding too much power from an extension cord risks overheating and fire. Be sure to read all packaging and instructions carefully when purchasing an extension cord and ensure it is UL listed.

Holiday lights. Indoors or out, only use lights that have been tested by an approved testing laboratory for safety such as UL. All lights should be inspected for frayed wires, bare spots, broken or cracked sockets or excessive wear before plugging them in and discard any damaged sets of lights. Avoid stringing more than three light 
strands together.

Firing up the fireplace?
 Cool your ashes! Every year “cold” ashes result in house fires. Treat all ashes and coals as HOT ashes, even when you think they have had enough time to cool. Your garage, house or deck are unsafe locations for ashes to cool and have been the site of many recent and devastating fires both locally and nationally. Take extreme care when disposing ashes and follow these tips: 

-          Allow all ashes to cool in place for several days, when possible.
-         When it’s time to dispose of ashes, transfer them to a metal container and wet them down. Only use an approved metal ash bucket that has a tight fitting metal lid.
-         Store the container outside, away from structures, decks, fences, wood piles or other combustible materials.
-          Never use a vacuum cleaner to pick up ashes and don’t dispose of ashes outside on a windy day. The wind can whip up what may have seemed like cool embers, making them fiery hot, and igniting nearby combustibles.

Candle fires peak during the holiday season. Most holiday candle fires occur when people leave burning candles unattended or place candles too close to holiday decorations. Keep candles in sight, in a secure holder and on a safe surface away from children and pets. Consider using flameless, battery-operated candles making them much safer.

Give space heaters space and ensure at least a 3-foot clearance from anything that can burn. Do not overload the electrical circuit or use extension cords with space heaters. Always stay in the room while a space heater is operating and turn it off when leaving the room or going to sleep. Follow all manufacturer recommendations and make sure your space heater meets all safety standards.

Cooking is a top cause of holiday fires. Be alert, focused and stay in the kitchen when cooking. Keep things that can catch fire, such as oven mitts, wooden utensils, food wrappers and towels away from the cooking area. Make sure kids and pets stay at least three feet away from the stove and oven, hot food, and liquids to avoid serious burns.

Disposing of your tree –
never put tree branches or needles in a fireplace or wood-burning stove. When the tree becomes dry, discard it promptly. The best way to dispose of your tree is by having the County’s recycling service pick it up on the designated day(s).

Do you hear what I hear? Having working smoke alarms DOUBLE your chances of surviving a fire however smoke alarms do not last forever. If your alarms are 10 years old or older, they need to be replaced with new alarms.  Bottom line: don't wait for a fire to test your smoke alarm. 




Thursday, November 3, 2016

Champion for Children’s Safety Recognized


One car seat at a time, she’s making a big difference


The Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service is proud to announce that Emilie Crown, Manager of Montgomery County Fire & Rescue Service’s nationally recognized Car Seat Safety Program, was selected to receive the prestigious Barbara A. Foley Quality, Safety and Injury Prevention Award. The award recognizes individuals who exemplify exceptional innovation, dedication and advocacy in the field of emergency services.

Emilie has been leading the way in advancing safety for children for over 36 years. Initially as an Emergency Department nurse before bringing her talents to Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service to lead the department’s car seat safety program. She is the State’s only certified instructor for Safe Travel for all Children, a course that includes the travel needs of children with special healthcare needs. Emilie is well-known throughout the region for her contributions, tireless efforts, leadership and deep commitment to the safety and well-being of Montgomery County’s youngest residents and she leads the way in educating parents, caregivers and first responders on the importance of car seat safety. Over 150,000 seats have been inspected and installed in Montgomery County since the beginning of the program in 2000.

“Emilie’s efforts have been outstanding and she works tirelessly for the residents of Montgomery County,” said Fire Chief Scott Goldstein. “National research shows that three out of four car seats are used incorrectly. The goal of the car seat program is to educate on the proper use of car seats, booster seats and seat belts and to ultimately save lives. Emilie has also played a pivotal role in educating legislators on the importance of car seat laws designed to protect children. If you’re looking for a passionate educator and advocate for children’s safety, look no further.”

The award is one of the highest awards presented by the Emergency Nurses Association and was presented to Mrs. Crown on September 17, 2016 in Los Angeles, California. For more information about Montgomery County Fire & Rescue's Car Seat Program visit www.mcfrs.org/mcsafe.




About the Emergency Nurses Association 
The Emergency Nurses Association (ENA) is the premier professional nursing association dedicated to defining the future of emergency nursing through advocacy, education, research, innovation, and leadership. Founded in 1970, ENA has proven to be an indispensable resource to the global emergency nursing community. With more than 42,000 members worldwide, ENA advocates for patient safety, develops industry-leading practice standards and guidelines, and guides emergency healthcare public policy. ENA members have expertise in triage, patient care, disaster preparedness, and all aspects of emergency care. Additional information is available at
www.ena.org.

Tuesday, November 1, 2016

What Time Is It?

Time to CHANGE your clocks & CHECK your smoke alarms this weekend
   
Simple task can be a potentially life-saving one!

Daylight savings time ends November 6th and the Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service is asking all residents to check their smoke alarms and carbon monoxide detectors to ensure they are working when they change their clocks this weekend.   

“Home fires injure and kill thousands every year,” said Fire Chief Scott Goldstein.  “Smoke alarms that are properly installed and maintained play a vital role in reducing fire deaths and injuries. I encourage everyone to test their smoke alarms, replace any alarms that are 10 years or older and conduct a home fire drill this weekend.”

The peak time for home fire fatalities is between 11 p.m. and 6 a.m. when most families are sleeping. A working smoke alarm dramatically increases the chance for survival and provides advance warning of a fire resulting in more time to react and put a home escape plan into action. 

Help keep your family safe by following these fire safety tips:

1.      Install smoke alarms on every level of your home, including the basement, and in all sleeping areas.
2.     Do you know if your smoke alarm is impacted by Maryland’s new law? Battery-only smoke alarms need to be replaced by 1/1/2018 with new smoke alarms that have sealed in, 10-year long life batteries.   
3.      Retire old smoke alarms and replace with new ones every 10 years. Like any electronic device, smoke alarms wear out over time and need to be replaced. The life expectancy of smoke alarms is 10 years. Smoke alarms work by sensing smoke particles and after 10 years, the smoke sensors lose their sensitivity. The test button only confirms that the battery, electronics and alerting system are working; not that the smoke sensor is working.
4.      Plan and practice home fire drills regularly. Decide in advance who will help family members that may need assistance escaping (young children, older adults or people with disabilities).        
6.      Make sure children recognize the sound of your smoke alarm and how to respond to its signal.
7.      Know your battery type. Sealed smoke alarms equipped with 10-year batteries are becoming more common and the batteries do not need to be replaced if they are sealed into the unit. Check your smoke alarms to see what type of battery it uses. While 10-year, long-life batteries do not need to be replaced annually, the entire smoke alarm unit does need to be replaced every ten years.Hard-wired smoke alarms, not affected by the new law, should have a battery backup and like all smoke alarm units need to be replaced every 10 years.


Got questions? Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service conducts free home safety checks of smoke alarms for residents at no cost. Please call 311 for information or visit our website for info as well as year-round safety information at www.mcfrs.org/mcsafe

Saturday, October 29, 2016

Countdown to Halloween - Tips for a Safe and Fun Night

With Halloween quickly approaching, the Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service offers some important tips for a safe Halloween. "Recent research shows that children are four times more likely to be hit by a car on Halloween than any other night of the year, said Fire Chief Scott Goldstein. “Fatal collisions between motor vehicles and young pedestrians occur most frequently between the hours of 4 and 8 p.m. It’s a dangerous night because so many kids are on the streets, many without their parents or an adult, and in their excitement often forget important pedestrian safety rules.”

Plan a safe route.

1. Accompany children and remind them to stop at all street corners, cross only at intersections and crosswalks. Teach them to look left, right and left before crossing the street and to continue looking both ways as they cross. If you’re a motorist, please slow down and be prepared to give trick or treaters a brake.

2. Stay in familiar neighborhoods and have a parent or responsible adult accompany trick or treaters. Visit only those houses where the lights are on. Accept treats only in the doorway and NEVER go inside a house or apartment.

3. Secure emergency identification (name, address, phone number) discreetly within Halloween attire or on a bracelet.

4. Safety in numbers. If they’re old enough to trick-or-treat without an adult, designate a route before the kids go trick or treating, tell your kids to stay in a group, avoid taking short cuts through backyards and alleys and ask them to check in regularly.

5. Ensure trick-or-treaters stay away from open flames or jack-o-lanterns with candles burning.

6. Children should avoid busy streets, always use sidewalks, and follow all traffic rules and regulations. Motorists should drive slowly and be alert to small children crossing streets. Many accidents occur when motorists are backing vehicles out of driveways, unaware of the presence of small children.

Be a good neighbor.
 
 
1. Keep your porch lights on and eliminate tripping hazards on your porch and walkway.  Remove outdoor safety hazards such as toys, bicycles, garden hoses and lawn ornaments. Make sure the driveway and steps are cleared of leaves, which can be a slipping and falling hazard. Make sure that the driveway and walks are well lit for incoming trick-or-treaters. Replace burned-out or broken light bulbs.

2. Pets get frightened on Halloween. Confine your pets for their safety and for that of trick or treaters.

Be Safe – Be Seen.

1. Don't assume the right-of-way. Motorists may have trouble seeing trick-or-treaters in the dark. Just because one car stops doesn't mean others will. 

2. Encourage kids to follow all the rules for pedestrian safety. That includes obeying all traffic laws, looking both ways before crossing, using crosswalks, crossing at intersections and corners and never darting between parked cars.

All Dressed Up.

1. Plan costumes that are bright and have reflective qualities. Consider adding reflective tape or decals to costumes and trick or treat bags. Be sure kids carry a flashlight and use glow sticks for extra visibility.

2. When shopping for costumes, wigs and accessories purchase only those with a label indicating they are flame resistant.

3. Have an adult inspect treats BEFORE eating anything. Do not eat any unwrapped, partially wrapped, or homemade-looking treats.

4. Shorter IS safer. Make sure that shoes fit well and that costumes are short enough to prevent tripping, entanglement or contact with flame.

5. Because masks can limit or block eyesight, consider non-toxic makeup as a safer alternative.

6. If a sword, cane or stick is part of your child’s costume, make sure it is not sharp or too long. A child may be easily hurt by these accessories if they trip or fall.

Decorate Safely.

1. Illuminate your jack-o’-lanterns with flashlights or battery-operated candles instead of real ones. You won’t have the worries of an open flame coming in contact with anything or anyone.

2. If you do use candles, keep them well away from where trick or treaters will be walking or standing. Review with your children the principle of “stop, drop and roll” should their clothing catch fire.

Lastly, teach children how to call 9-1-1 if they have an emergency or become lost.

Thursday, October 13, 2016

Don’t be scared, be ready with a free Halloween CPR class! Reservations Required.

The only thing scarier than Halloween is not knowing how to save a life using CPR. Sudden cardiac arrest (SCA) is the leading cause of death among American adults.  Learn how to save the lives of your family and friends with a FREE CPR class and costume party. Please wear costumes however please keep your costumes family friendly and no weapons/simulated weaponry permitted! Refreshments and door prizes will be provided. All ages are welcome.  Act fast, limited space. 

Saturday, October 29, 2016
4:00 - 6:00 p.m.

Public Safety Headquarters
100 Edison Park Drive
Gaithersburg, MD 20878
* Secure Facility - ID required

To Register:
*This class is open to Montgomery County residents ONLY and does NOT result in certification. The Montgomery Community Emergency response Team (CERT) offers this  class free of charge to  Montgomery County Residents. The class are taught by ASHI professional instructors and Montgomery County EMT’s.

For more information, please contact the CERT Program Manager: greg.stjames@montgomerycountymd.gov.

Wednesday, October 12, 2016

Partnering Up for Your Safety! RVFD Thanks the City of Rockville for its ALS Chase Car

On Monday, Officers and Members of the Rockville Volunteer Fire Department presented ALS703 to the Rockville Mayor and Council. The unit which was recently placed in service was purchased with grant funding from the City of Rockville.

The RVFD would like to thank Mayor Bridget Donnell Newton and the Council for their support to the RVFD and the citizens we serve. ALS703 is staffed with a Paramedic which responds to reported critical emergency medical calls alongside an ambulance staffed with Emergency Medical Technicians.  ALS703 allows the paramedic to rapidly assess a patient and determine if advanced life support (ALS) is needed.  After the assessment, the paramedic will transport (ride with) the patient in the ambulance to the hospital when advanced care is needed.

There are many benefits of the Paramedic Chase Unit (PCU) which include a rapid return to service if the patient does not require the care of a paramedic during transport. This reduces the time a paramedic is unavailable to provide care to other potential patients.  Prior to the Paramedic Chase Unit or ALS Chase Car, paramedics where assigned to staff transport ambulances. With the paramedic assigned to a transport ambulance, they were the primary care provider even when a patient did not require higher level care.


Currently MCFRS has Paramedic Chase Units at the Rockville Volunteer Fire Department, Wheaton Volunteer Rescue Squad and Bethesda-Chevy Chase Rescue Squad.  These units are each owned by the local fire and rescue departments and staffed with MCFRS career and volunteer professionals. Over the next couple of months, MCFRS will place additional PCU's in service resulting in a more efficient delivery of ALS service throughout the County.


Thursday, September 29, 2016

Life Safety Educator of the Year

CONGRATULATIONS to retired Battalion Chief Jim Resnick who was selected as the 2015 Mid-Atlantic Life Safety Educator of the Year.

This very prestigious award was presented by Maryland Fire Marshal Brian Geraci and Maryland Secretary of State Police William Pallozzi yesterday during the annual Mid-Atlantic Life Safety Conference hosted at the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab in recognition of his leadership and outstanding and distinguished work in the area of public safety. 

Known for his passion and enthusiasm for public education, Jim’s desire to help others began at a young age. Growing up, he lived near busy River Road which was frequently the site of vehicle collisions. Jim kept a metal toolbox stuffed with bandages and first aid supplies on his bike so he could rush to the aid of the injured. In middle school, he was first to sign up after an announcement offering First Aid Training by the Red Cross and the rest is, as they say, history. Jim joined the Bethesda-Chevy Chase Rescue Squad in 1976 on the first day he was eligible at age 17 ½ years old and continues as an active volunteer there today.
 

Jim's leadership, personal integrity, energy and commitment to the residents of Montgomery County and the State of Maryland have been the hallmarks of a distinguished career and a lifelong commitment to public service. Jim's drive and passion to help others spans over 40 years as both a career and volunteer firefighter and paramedic. Most recently, Jim has been leading MCFRS Community Outreach and Risk Reduction efforts in Senior Outreach where he has been known to chase down senior citizens to talk about the importance of working smoke alarms and the department's free home safety check program. He has collaborated with dozens of County agencies and departments to develop innovative programs to reach those residents at greatest risk and ensures that first responders are trained on the unique skillsets needed when working with an aging population.  

Jim has been a determined champion of fire safety, injury prevention and education since those early days “responding” on his bike. MCFRS congratulates Jim on this outstanding achievement and very special honor! Jim's wife and his 94-year-old father surprised him and were in the audience during the award presentation. 
In talking to Jim after receiving the award – he was speechless – and those that know Jim know that is quite a feat! 







News You Can Use: New Driving Laws take effect Saturday

Maryland has several new driving laws on the books that take effect on Saturday, October 1. Among them is one that focuses on impaired driving; another requires proof of insurance. 

The Drunk Driving Reduction Act of 2016, also known as Noah’s Law, mandates the use of an ignition interlock for those convicted of drunk driving and significantly increases administrative driver’s license suspension periods. Noah’s Law was named in honor of Montgomery County Police Officer Noah A. Leotta, who was struck by a drunk driver while pulling over another suspected drunk driver during a holiday patrol. Tragically, he died a few days later as a result of his injuries.

Another law going into effect October 1 requires drivers to carry with them their current vehicle insurance identification card issued by their insurance company. It may be on paper or plastic or in electronic format. Starting July 1, 2017, anyone without a current vehicle insurance card can be charged a $50 fine.



For additional information on these and other laws going into effect on Saturday: News Release



Saturday, September 24, 2016

Ready for Service: New Wheaton Volunteer Rescue Squad

Many were on hand as Wheaton Volunteer Rescue Squad (WVRS) officially dedicated Rescue Squad 742 and put the unit in service following today's 1:00 p.m. ceremony. Rescue Squad 742 will provide vital emergency services to the residents and businesses of the Wheaton community and Montgomery County. The Rescue Squad will respond to incidents that range from structural fires, vehicle extrication's, technical rescues and other types of complex, emergency incidents that require the technical services and advanced capabilities provided by specialized heavy rescue squads.

The Rescue Squad replaces a vehicle with over two decades of service and 192,000 miles logged. Purchased with support from community donations and grants, Rescue Squad 742 is one of the most advanced vehicles of its type in the region. The truck was custom build and features three winches, a 9,000 watt light tower and extrication tools powered by dual hydraulic generators. 

WVRS is located in the heart of the growing, thriving, 
multicultural community of Wheaton and responds to over 11,000 emergency calls annually in partnership with the Montgomery County Fire and Rescue Service. The WVRS has served the community since 1955 through generous donations of its neighbors and the surrounding community. Visit: www.wvrs.org for more information.






Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Rolltide? Roll Safety! Alabama Style.

Montgomery County Fire and Rescue was honored to have Jim Resnick invited to attend and present at the Alabama Association of Fire Chiefs Leadership Conference on Fire Prevention and Community Risk Reduction this week.

Jim presented to over 100 Fire Chiefs and other fire service leaders from across Alabama. He outlined the proactive Community Risk Reduction strategies, initiatives and educational programs that are having big impact in Montgomery County and resulting in a safer, resilient and engaged community. While Community Risk Reduction is a growing concept in many fire departments, Fire Chief Scott Goldstein ensures it's a tactical priority and part of each morning's roll call.






 





 

Monday, September 19, 2016

Safety for Life! It's Child Passenger Safety Week


Every 33 seconds, a child under 13 is involved in a crash. That's a terrifying statistic and one that demands immediate attention. Although highly preventable, motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of death for children ages 1 to 13. Proper use of car seats, booster seats and seat belts has the potential to reduce these deaths, as well as many more injuries.

The U.S. Department of Transportation’s National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) is sponsoring Child Passenger Safety Week, September 18-24, 2016 and throughout the year, Montgomery County Fire & Rescue’s child passenger safety technicians are dedicated to helping parents and caregivers learn how to correctly install child safety seats and properly buckle up children, whether it’s in child safety seats, booster seats or when using the vehicle’s seat belts.

For more information: MCFRS Car Seat Program








Friday, September 16, 2016

You're Invited! Saturday, September 17

The Germantown Volunteer Fire Department's Open House kicks off at 11:00 a.m. tomorrow!

This annual event will feature something for everyone. Watch firefighting demonstrations, meet everyone's favorite Fire Dog, learn important information about Maryland's New Smoke Alarm Law and much more.

Get a front row seat to a live demo that will demonstrate the power of residential fire sprinklers when two identical rooms are side-by-side and put to the test.

The Open House runs from 11:00 - 3:00 p.m. See you there!


 

Saturday, September 10, 2016

Mark Your Calendars: October 1st is Rescue Day 2016

You're invited! The Bethesda-Chevy Chase Rescue Squad will hold its free annual Open House, “Rescue Day 2016,” on Saturday, October 1, from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.  Rescue Day 2016 is being held in conjunction with the Taste of Bethesda, the outdoor food festival held just two blocks away in Bethesda's restaurant district.

Fire and Rescue Activities and Displays for All Ages

Rescue Day 2016 will feature fire and rescue activities, education and displays for all ages, including tours of the station; live demonstrations of emergency medical, rescue, and firefighting equipment; free kids’ firefighter hats; a moon bounce; and more.  The Rescue Squad’s most advanced firefighting and rescue equipment, including emergency vehicles, will be on display.

A special visit by a helicopter used to transport critically injured patients to area hospitals when time is truly of the essence is planned. Visitors will get an up-close view of the helicopter and have the opportunity to meet the flight medics.  (Because the helicopter may need to respond to emergencies throughout the day, its appearance at our event is subject to change.) 

Step back in history and check out “Rescue 15” which is the Squad’s sleek 1972 Cadillac ambulance. The last Cadillac to serve in the Squad’s fleet, “Rescue 15” now serves in a ceremonial function at Squad open houses, parades, and other events and has become a favorite of kids and families. 

Learn what it takes to be a first responder, all about volunteer opportunities with the Squad and the free training provided to become EMTs, Firefighters and Paramedics. 




Directions, Parking & Transportation Options
The Bethesda-Chevy Chase Rescue Squad is located at 5020 Battery Lane, at the intersection of Old Georgetown Road. Ample parking is available at the Montgomery County public parking garages within walking distance of the Rescue Squad. For parking information visit www.montgomerycountymd.gov/DOT-Parking/bethesda/bethesda-garage-36.html.

For more information visit: www.bccrs.org



Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Don’t wait. Communicate!



September is National Preparedness Month

In recent years, devastating earthquakes, tornadoes, winter storms, floods and wildfires have highlighted the need for Americans to prepare for natural disasters. However, according to the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), over half of Americans have not discussed or developed a family emergency plan.

Do
you have a plan in place for your family? Does everyone know where to meet, how family members will communicate following an emergency or disaster and how you’ll stay informed? Your ability to recover from an emergency tomorrow could depend on your planning and preparation today! Don't wait.

Take a minute, talk to family members, make sure your kids know important phone numbers and include seniors and any family members that require assistance in your plan.
Get started at www.ready.gov/make-a-plan